Transcribed Philly BoyMovie

Philly Boy is a documentary about MC Breeze aka Joey B Ellis here is a transcription the movie is at the bottom of the page.

 

Bring the Beat Back Presents…

In association with Still Breeze Entertainment……A Film By Mike D.

Transcribed

 PHILLY BOY Online

A Movie About MC BREEZE

(Aka Joey B. Ellis)

Transcribed by Laura Nabors  Edited By Lisa Nabors

“My biggest accomplishment was being a ghetto, welfare cheese eating, kid and to have the wherewithal to say ‘I’m going to make a record company’ in a time where I had seen nobody else do it.  I didn’t even know if it was at all possible.”

 

MC BREEZE

 

Baby DST

Old School Philly DJ:

“Breeze is like a true Philly legend beyond belief.  Yes, he should have a movie!”

 

Schoolly D

Philadelphia Rap Legend:

“You couldn’t tell a story about Philadelphia and not include Discombobulatorbubulator or MC Breeze… how are you going to do that?  How are you going to go from one point,  how are you going to go from Schoolly D to Jazzy Jeff without having MC Breeze like right there?  You know what I’m saying?  It’s like a link in a chain like right in between that.  You can’t.

Jazzy Jeff

Philadelphia Rap Legend:

“Breeze has always been, you know, a step or two or three in front of everybody else.”

 

Cash Money

World Champion DJ:

“The singing MC Breeze

Lady B

Philadelphia Hip Hop Legend:

“There was only one Breeze, that’s what we’ve always said.  Breeze didn’t follow and has always been unique and has confidence in himself that he always thought his own style of clothing was the bomb and his own style of rapping.  He’s never followed anybody, even until today.  Breeze is Breeze.”

Jazzy Jeff:

“I know a lot of guys out there that can do something really well and I think that Breeze is the kind of guy that he can do a lot of things really well.

 

The Mighty B Force

Philadelphia Hip Hop Pioneers:

“He created the singing rapper I gotta give him credit… he’s the only one – can’t nobody do it like him. “He did it when it wasn’t cool!”

 

Cash Money:

“He would sing!  Sing and rhyme at the same time, man!”

 

Jazzy Jeff:

“Breeze was the guy that could make and fix his own equipment, you know.  Breeze would sew his own clothes…”

 

Funk Wizard Snow

Phillyhiphop.com:

He would wear like purple leather outfits and like, you know – glow in the dark orange suits – not what other people were wearing…. MC Breeze is not a fashion plate.

 

E-Vette Money

Philadelphia Rap Pioneer:

“Breeze was like – Oh, well  I’m Breeze, and I’m going to do what Breeze is going to do, exactly”

 

JJ:

And he would rhyme, and then he would grab a guitar and he would sing and you know, like at that time, I don’t think anybody was used to somebody that had that much talent.

 

DST:

Breeze could do a show and he could come and command a crowd and have the fellas like hype and then he could break it down and have the females just like – Oh my God – he can sing too!

 

FWS:

His records were like classics, consistently.

 

E-Vette:

Every morning I wake up I eat Cap N Crunch, I had the same thing for dinner and the same thing for lunch!

 

Dice Raw

Philly Emcee:

“Discombobulatorbubulator – ha ha ha ha”

 

?uestlove

The Roots:

(Whistling, pretends to spin records)

 

FWS:

You’re talking about a man who sold records world wide.

 

?uestlove:

I’m a big MC Breeze fan – I wish I had a microphone.  One night he got on stage and sang Discombobulatorbubulator… I know there were a lot of young ones were in the audience like what?  Of course its not politically correct to make fun of a Chinese person, but you know…

 

FWS:

People on a national level might know him as Joey B. Ellis from the Rocky V soundtrack.

Malika Love

Old School Philly Emcee:

I didn’t know he was on the Rocky V soundtrack until I turned around and actually looked at the TV and saw him and I still didn’t know because I saw the name – Joey B. Ellis – and I was like – Who is this – and they were like “Go For It!, Go For It!”

 

 

FWS:

MC Breeze just had a string of hits and he made us feel good because he worked at Domino’s Pizza and saved up his money, so – again, MC Breeze was a reflection of us.

 

E-Vette:

He didn’t take no junk from nobody either! He didn’t play that, you know?

He had his mind set on something and his mind was set on it, it was like, ain’t nobody gonna change his mind about nothing – nobody wasn’t gonna control anything.  Breeze, you know that’s why he had to have his own label, MC Breeze Records, because he was in control and he wanted to do it the way Breeze wanted it to be done….

 

MC Breeze:

My name is MC Breeze – the original MC Breeze aka Joey B. Ellis, my real name is Joseph B. Ellis” (singing “I’m just a Philly Boy… rap:  in ‘Illadelphia I was born and raised, baby… singing “I’m just a Philly Boy…” )  That’s basically it….

I was about six years old, watching a television show called Roosevelt Franklin Elementary School, and it was the only black puppets on Sesame Street, and there was this one kid in the school who had a problem like the other kids were teasing him and he ended up being able to do something in the class that none of the other kids could do…so he went from being you know the picked-on kid to a hero and his name was ‘Cool Baby Breeze’ that was the name of the character and I just said Yo! – That’s me, you know, because me and my mom would go at it and she would say some things to me that really got to me… she would say things to get to me. I had a big head for the size that I was as a kid and this puppet also had a big head, so it was like, wow, I could relate to this puppet, I was like that puppet is me, I mean that guy….I’m feelin this puppet you know I’m feelin him having these problems, but then there is stuff inside of him that people don’t even have a clue about… I said that’s me!  And so, I said that’s me. I said ‘My name is Cool Baby Breeze’, you know I’m a six-year old, running around, like call me Cool Baby

Breeze, and I eventually got to be too old for ‘Baby’ and too cool for ‘Cool’ and I was just stuck with ‘Breeze’.

 

FWS:

My name is Funk Wizard Snow, and I’m the editor of Phillyhiphop.com.  I don’t necessarily believe that there is a sound of Philly from the old school per say, but if I was forced to choose one MC that would be representative of the sound; it would definitely be MC Breeze.  Breeze was from North Philly, um and you know I got into hip hop there, and watchin AJ, PJ and the Rock Brothers do block parties,  I think down on Lehigh Avenue, and then his family moved to ‘The Bottom’ in West Philly and that was where he met up with B Force.  The ‘B’ in B Force stands for ‘Bottom’.

 

B Force:

Just ask the questions, man, OK, we gonna be real man, I mean this is uncut, for real, raw, we ain’t gonna curse or nothing, we’re just gonna be real.

 

JJ:

The bottom is more like 38th and Lancaster, you know down that way, you know, borderline from the bottom of West Philly, that’s why it’s called ‘The Bottom’, it’s from the bottom of West Philly into like, Center City.

 

SD:

There was this sneaker store called Giant’s…..

(Group outside)

“The original Giant’s store was like a white man with some Tarzan shit on it, remember? Oh yeah! (background laughter)”

 

SD:

There was this big giant like outside and you would be like jumpin off the little trolley, looking around, run into the sneaker store, get a pair of Converse and just put them mother fuckers on and just run out, wait till you see the trolley and just run out and get your ass back to your own neighborhood…. That’s what it was like ‘down The Bottom’, that’s what it was like all over Philadelphia

(Neighborhood Scenes/Friends)

 

BForce:

It was just the neighborhoods, and there was everything, you know? Some people had rundown houses, and somebody had the best house on the block and somebody had a Cadillac on the block and everybody else caught the bus… we come from straight ghetto down the bottom, man the sto’ was at the bottom, not like middle class, yeah we the same people, take bread and cheese and put it in the oven and make the cheese turn burnt straight ghetto class, yeah man we ain’t had no money down here – shit we ain’t got no money now!

 

Breeze:

My mom was really young when she had me, she was like fifteen years old and um, well, she was fifteen years old and by the time she was nineteen, she had three boys.  My real father, he ended up in jail for whatever reasons, I don’t even know, but she met my pop, my step-pop, and I was about three years old when she met him, and he’s been with her throughout the duration, so I had a father in the home, even though he wasn’t my biological father, he was always there.  I was a dreamer, so we bumped heads a lot because her thing was, she was trying to protect her young black kid from having dreams that he couldn’t reach, to kind of protect me from going out there and not being able to achieve these huge dreams that I had and being frustrated.   I was determined that I wasn’t going to stop dreaming and she was determined that she was going to stop me from dreaming too much so that I didn’t get hurt….

 

B Force:

I’m Hand Master Flash – Mighty B Force; Disco Dave- Mighty B Force; Trevor Flash-  BET Disco; DJ Ernie Ern – BET Disco….

 

Breeze:

The first time the Hip Hop bug bit me was when I heard Kurtis Blow ‘These are The Breaks’ on the radio and I mean, this guy, we was just like – hey, you know ‘Clap your hands everybody if you got what it takes…’ and I’m like listening to this guy and he’s like rockin this song and there’s like no singing in it, there’s just like this beat and this guy driving and his voice basically made me feel good while I was listening to the radio.

And I knew immediately that I wanted to make people feel the same way that I felt when I  heard ‘The Breaks’ and so I just started writing my own raps ‘By age four I’m a able bodied man, who can rap on the mic better than I can?  My B is for breaking it down…. And I went from B all the way to Z and that was probably the first thing I wrote and I thought it was clever and nobody hadn’t heard it before.   My father had gave me two BSR turntables.  I couldn’t afford the Technics turntable that people were using to spin with, so I had the BSRs and I would go back to back with records  and I had these two BSR turntables and I actually built  a mount which both BSRs fit in a slot.  I created my own mixer which was just this thing that just switched from one turntable to the other and I would rap and mix records at the same time.  I had a mic in the middle of the turntable and I would play like “122 Beats A Minute” and ‘ziga ziga boom’ and I’m like ‘My A is for any able bodied man who could rap better than I can’ and then I’m hitting the next record…….

 

B Force:

I think that his being able to sing makes him unique.  Yeah man, we ain’t never heard nobody singing and rapping at the same time, so when he did that, and added it onto beats, people were stuck on that ‘cause he had a jawn , I don’t feel like singing right now, but the words would go We are the B Force and no DJ’s can F… with us…..

 

Breeze:

Zig zig zigga zigga (hand mixing and singing)  “We are the B Force, no DJ’s can get with us, ‘cause I am the MC Breeze and he is HandMaster Flash and we’re the B Force Boys my ladies, try to fuck with us and your crazy.  I’m MC Breeze and girls call me the shit…” zig zig zigga and then I would just start rapping and it was on from there…

 

B Force:

We used to live off of that, yeah I mean everybody used to sing that, yeah that was the jawn and Breeze used to do that every time he did a show and they was singing right with him and know the words.

 

JJ:

Way, way back in the day, it was kind of like territorial with the DJ crews, you know B Force kind of controlled ‘The Bottom’.

 

DJ Grem:

Black Knights of Funk:

Black Knights of Funk from East Mt Airy, and Grand Masters of Funk from West Oak Lane, B Force – West Philly, Grand Master Nell – MCCs of  South Philly, Sex Machine – North Philly, Force Five – Mt. Airy.  Mix Master Flash and PipeMan  – Norristown, DJ Thorpe from up the way, ……….. Those were the primary groups that were making noise in Philly from the early 80s up till I’d say about ’85 when the scene started to change…. Oh hold up, DJ Jazzy Jeff –  Network crew.

 

JJ:

It wasn’t just who had a dope DJ, you know, who had a dope MC, you know, it was who had the equipment…

 

DJ Grem:

Oh you definitely had to bring the noise.

 

JJ:

Grandmasters of Funk was the top!  Those guys had speakers you could walk in!

 

FWS:

B Force always put on a show.

 

DST:

I mean, you think of B Force, the first two names of B Force you would think of was Disco Dave and MC Breeze.  And then you had Ernie, and then you had Trevor and then you had HandMaster Flash and he used to handcuff himself.

 

FWS:

They were the kind of forced people to believe that they were larger than they really were because of the theatrics that they used.

 

DST:

He would play one track, turn around put his handcuffs on and he used to use a record of GrandMaster Flash, um off their album, and he used to be like yo Flash, yo Flash, this time cut it in.

 

JJ:

B Force was really known for C-Fly.

 

DST:

Oh my God! How could I forget C-Fly?!

 

JJ:

C-Fly was the light man.

 

DST:

C-Fly would have a helmet with Christmas light bulbs all on it, then have a wooden like scaffold they done built.

 

JJ:
You came to a block party or a party and you got these guys with these humongous stacks of speakers and all these lights over top that spells out the name “B Force”.

 

FWS:

When it came down to the music, they were talented, um, but they made sure that there was always more going on than just focusing on the DJ and the MC.

 

Malika:

Light shows, um smoke bombs.

 

FWS:

The long intros, you know the stage being darkened and then they step on stage and you know the lights come up

 

JJ:

And you gotta keep in mind, like cats didn’t really have a lot of money, so we were jacking traffic lights and wiring them up to switch boxes, you know and like that was pretty much our light show so these guys would come in and just blow you off of the map.

 

FWS:

For the mid 1980s, that was a big deal.

 

JJ:

That’s one thing that I always was a fan about B Force.  B Force had the respect of ‘The Bottom’ you know, everybody from ‘The Bottom’ came out to represent them which was really cool, to show that kind of love.

 

FWS:

They would rent a U-Haul truck and I mean you’re not supposed to put people in the back of a U-Haul truck, but they would just pull up to the corners “down The Bottom’.

 

B Force:

And they would drive people like two trucks, three trucks, just to have people like there to support us.

 

JJ:

When B Force was new, B Force kind of de-throned Disco Rap at one of the city-wide battles of the DJ’s and then B Force became recognized and B Force got rap, you know because they didn’t have a sound system like Rap, but they came out with 500 people again and when you got a support system, you know it’s pretty hard for you to lose.

 

B Force:

You gotta understand, we was just like the king of Philadelphia in DJ-ing, man…. If our name was on the card, man we ain’t never had no turn out that was bad… we still kept the house parties going, no matter what, and all the city, man, we kept the house parties going and that’s how Breeze came in.

 

Breeze:

I would go to their block parties and see these guys, just blowing up the block and I just said …. “Can I rap?”   And they were like “Yeah, you could rap – you’re the guy around the corner who does like his own thing with the turntables – of course you can rap” – and I started rapping and initially, it just started off as me just trailing the group and rapping wherever they went, but what happened was that people started to love what I did so much that they didn’t know that I wasn’t really a part of B Force initially, you know so it kind of just happened and so then they started to come and get me, like, we’re going this place, come on with us and so it kind of like gelled.

 

Yo, we’re at the 39th St outside playground and this is where we used to do the outside parties at.  The thing was that we used to make people pay a dollar all winter long to come into the house parties, so then in the summertime, we gave parties for free.  Basically, what we used to do is um, in this area, B Force would be set up and everything and then pull the U-Haul truck up back there and load the equipment out and just basically had a table, two turntables on it, some amps, some speakers and we got our electricity from any of the houses that would agree to give us electricity for that night.  I see a couple of houses are vacant now, maybe we made the electric bills too high and they had to move.  You didn’t have to tell nobody it was a block party, all you had to do was just come set the equipment up.  You got people coming off Island St., Tasker St., 38th St., 39th St., everywhere.  See, back then, you have to understand, people danced to the music.  People don’t dance no more, not the young people, they just stand around and look at each other.  With the advent of the automatic weapon in the neighborhoods, that eliminated a lot of the house parties, you know and they were getting killed and it was beyond an issue of just losing your child, it was a child in your home, in your basement, in your neighborhood, so a lot of house parties slowed down and stopped, pretty much diminished to none, so that gave people less outlets to be able to rap, to be able to show off the new dances and the whole nine because it’s one thing to go to a club downtown and dance with people that you don’t know, and it’s another thing to dance among your peers, you know, people that you grew up with all your life.  Now they’re seeing and they’re watching you do the freshest dance and you get feedback from people that you’re around cause it’s hard to get recognition from your own family and your own friends.

We would give a show and that show would consist of me prompting the DJ to do certain scratches and the DJ mixing…

 

 

DJ Grem:

It was real basic back then. You had your drums and your snares and maybe a horn or a guitar riff or something like that and basically that’s what we as the DJs were catching, catching a guitar riff or catch the snare, catch the drum or the base beat or whatever, and then the MC did all the work.

 

Breeze:

My job was to keep the crowed involved, you know, keep them hyped , you know I would just look out and look at the crowd and see somebody that was a little bit enthused about what they were doing and bring attention to them ‘Oh yeah, I see you…check it out’ or something and then people would get even more hyped.  The thing that I had that a lot of the new guys don’t have, is that I had a venue every week to do it.  You know, every weekend, I had to come up with new rhymes and new styles and new flavas because people was coming back to the house parties so then I can’t come the same way I came last week, so I had to keep elevating my styles.  I went for crowd response, that was my thing….how could I get the crowd to move, I would change my voice –  (raspy voice) ‘rap like this’, just try all kinds of voices and all kinds of stuff….cartoon voices, whatever it took.

 

B Force:

He was on the ground grinding, he did the Prince thing and licking his tongue and do splits and all kinds of stuff.  All pulled together, we was unstoppable.  He just took us to a whole nother level.  You know, he would do a split, get back up, you know I ain’t gonna try that…

 

Breeze:

(Playing guitar)  I got my first guitar when I was about five years old.  I used to play in the jazz band at Mastbaum Vocational Technical High.  When you go to a Vo-Tech school, you get a trade and my trade was engineering and drafting.  None of the other men in my family have graduated out of high school, so I was the first. (outside) Engineering was what I wanted to go into, but when I got to the twelfth grade,  I figured you’re in the trade, you’re from Philadelphia and in the best engineering school, and that’s Drexel, and I wanted to go there and the guy came from Drexel and said that in order to excel at Drexel in engineering, I would need three years of Trigonometry, um a certain amount of years of calculus and I mean different that I hadn’t gotten in math class at Vo-Tech, and I said ‘how do I get these skills that are necessary’ and the guy didn’t really have any answers for me and so I was disenchanted and so I said forget about college then, I’m going to find another way and it was my uncle that said ‘look – anything you want to learn you can read in a book and so when you go to college, they teach you out of a book.  If you want to learn it and be good at it, you go to the library and you get the book and you learn on your own and cut the middle man out.’  And that’s almost pretty much been a credo for my whole life, that’s what I do and follow.  Anything I want to learn, I just pick a manual up or pick a book up and learn how to do it. I was kicked out, I was 18 and my mom kicked me out and it wasn’t like I decided to leave.

 

B Force:

He thought that she really meant it, so he got out.

 

Breeze:

Actually, that first night I think I ended up on somebody’s porch and probably the next day I ended up at my uncle’s house.  He was a Muslim and what he taught me how to do was what he was doing everyday, he would go to 3rd and Market in Center City and in that area is the wholesale district in Philadelphia, so there’s a lot of places to sell you stuff wholesale and he would take me down there, put a five dollar bill in my hand, and I would buy like three or four pocket knives – they might  have cost me fifty cents and we would go to the neighborhood strips and I would just walk up and down Market Street selling pocket knives.  I was selling knives for probably like four or five dollars, so I made a $4.50 profit on a fifty cent investment and then I would get more money and I mean it got to a point where I was making three or four hundred dollars a day, just selling goods.

 

That pretty much sustained me for like eighteen, nineteen, twenty and I was still getting around to the rap battles and different DJ battles that we were having and as a part of B Force.  Ernie Ern was somebody that was in the neighborhood that eventually became a part of B Force and I used to go around his house a lot and his mom liked me, so I asked his mom could I stay there and cause I still wanted to, my uncle’s house was cool, but it was too far away from ‘The Bottom’ and so I needed to have a place in the area and so Ms. Lois let me live in her basement.

 

B Force:

I think Ernie put him up for two years,

 

Breeze:

I was rappin’ It was a good time, it was fun, but my whole thinking at that time was I got to be doing something else.  There has to be more than coming to these house parties every night. At the time, the group that I was in, what they was given, they figured they would buy me McDonald’s at the end of the night that I got paid, because I didn’t have any equipment.  All I needed was a mic.

 

B Force:

We were the DJ’s and back then the MC’s wasn’t as big as the DJ’s, so he was getting mad because he didn’t get paid.  So we were like, look, this is our equipment, these are our records, this is my man’s house right here, and it’s a four-way split…

 

Breeze:

I just thought that when I got on that mic and I start rockin that mic and people start requesting for me to be on that mic that I was a part of the group….

 

BF:

So that’s when he got mad and he took off and he decides that he wants to make a record.

 

?uestlove:

My name is ?uestlove, founder and drummer of ‘The Next Movement’.  Discombobulator… caused so much damned trouble it’s not funny.  Like in tenth grade, not at a talent show, but we were rehearsing for the school talent show and I decided to plaguerize that verse and by the time I got to ‘choy ch ch choy – hold up a minute you talking to fast I’ll break this glass and kick your damned ass…’ well, it was a Christian school (laughter) the English teachers were just like ‘NO!’  They were just like, oh man… I didn’t get in trouble, they didn’t call my mom, thank God they didn’t call my mom.

 

Breeze:

My biggest accomplishment was being a ghetto, welfare cheese eating, kid and to have the wherewithal to say “I’m going to make a record company” in a time where I had seen nobody else do it.  I didn’t even know if it was at all possible.”  It was gonna be Breeze and Flash records, me and Handmaster Flash from B Force, but he used all his money for clothes and shoes.  On top of my hustling money, I also got a Domino’s Pizza job to supplement that, and I took the cake that I made from that, and started Breeze Records and put out my first independent record. (Singing) “We all know where we started and we don’t mean to offend, but it ain’t New York this time everybody, cause Philly is stepping in…. Philly is stepping in.”   You know I would go to After Midnight and and some guy would say ‘Is the Bronx here?’ and somebody would raise their hands and you would know that they were from The Bottom.  You know, ‘Is Brooklyn in the house?’  And you would say – I know this guy went to school with me.  And it was like everybody was all enamored about New York and I’m like, nobody’s really pumping up Philadelphia.  At the time when I put out the record, I think we had PopArt records and they had steady beats….

 

SD:

And there was Slice or something like that and there was Schooly D records.

 

Breeze:

And at that time I didn’t know how I was gonna do it , so I did some researching, I went back to what my uncle told me…you wanna make records, you go get the book and I didn’t know what the books were, but I went to the library and did some research and I found out there was a press and print in my city called Disc Makers, I found out there was a recording studio, some recording studios around the city and I just had to find  something that I could afford.  We would go down to this club called Fat Cats and practice everything before we went into the studio, cause I was like, look, we can’t be in the studio because it’s by the hour and at the time it was like 25  bucks an hour, you know four-track studio and a doctor rhythm drum machine,  and a three lead guitar.  I think there was a Juno keyboard when we got there.  There were two rap songs, there was ‘It Ain’t New York’, ‘Discombobulatorbubalator’ ……… And on the flip side, I had a ballad.   ‘Discombobulatorbubalator’ ended up being the hit.

 

DST :

(viewing record) Breeze, the singing MC Breeze, Handmaster Flash, Discombobulatorbubalator ……… he did his own art work and everything…… all his stuff.  …. The original Discombobulatorbubalator ……..

 

FWS:

It Ain’t New York was gonna be a hit just because of the title and subject matter, but musically, Discombobulatorbubalator was a better song.

 

DST:

It was like a perfect record, there was like intro, beat, break, chorus, everything, it was like the perfect record.

 

FWS:

Discombobulatorbubalator was an up beat, you know a dance song.  I think that people what they lose today is that hip hop is a lot more down beat than it used to be.  It was a lot more dance oriented back then, so it had the higher beats per minute which was important and it had that heavy 808 base in it and that’s what people were feeling, that base and it just flowed, I mean it just was a song that just rolled on and on, it was just effortless.

 

(Grape St. Pub performance footage)

Breeze:

Yo! I’m old school baby and I’m like this check it out, yo I eat MCs for dinner, MCs for lunch, gimme a million and I’ll give your ass a millionaire punch, check it – I’m ma take you all the way back like this, like that check it out, uh, “Every morning I wake up, I eat Cap N Crunch, I eat the same thing for dinner and the same for lunch…. They call it Cap N Crunch, but I can’t tell, cause every time I eat that shit, it’s soggy as hell.  One particular morning after washing my bowl put on my tailor made sweatsuit and all my clothes……….. I got my own transportation my transpass card.  Went upstairs and I kicked the cat, I’d leave him alone if he’d a caught some rats.  See me and the cat we don’t get along, cause I used to have a hamster and now he’s gone……………t-t-ake this rhyme, but every t-t-ime I start uttering, I just c-c-ant stop stutterin’

 

?uestlove

Of course it’s not correct to do the Chinese Food verse

 

(Black Lily Artist showcase footage)  Chinese food can be cool as hell if you can go into the place and stand the smell.  Yo everything you buy smells exactly the same they just switch it around and change the name.  Beef Yat Chow Mein and Egg FooYoung, they call it chopped suey but it’s chopped cat tongue.  The soda’s taste like shrimp fried rice and the candy bars are cold as ice.  Well they sell everything from Snickers to Herr’s…. When they kill the cats what do they do with the furs?  Chinese food scares the shit out of me, but it really dosen’t matter when I get hungry.  About one o’clock I had a stomach ache I went up on the ave get a pepper steak.  Didn’t wanna be rude, so I ordered nice, he acted like he couldn’t hear me, so I ordered twice.  He said $3.49 I reached for my money.  I thought to myself this chink talks funny.

 

 

Bruce Web

Store Owner:

The ying yang verse was what was the controversy.  At that time, the Asians, they felt like he was putting them down, attacking the Asians with the term he had in there.

 

(performance):

Do you wanna soda with your order?  The Chinese sound like a broken tape recorder.

 

JJ:

Breeze was just giving his adaptation of what we go through in the hood everyday.

 

(perf):

I said that’s ok cause I’m on a diet, and the soda from here, you know I wouldn’t buy it. He got mad as hell started turning red

 

JJ:

You know, in every hood you got a Chinese store on the corner that, there were times that they wouldn’t be really cool to you.  You would go in there and you know, you would try to buy stuff and they would be real kind of mean and just kind of derogatory.

 

(Perf):

I could not understand a word he said he said a choy ch ch choy ch choy

 

BF:

Everybody knew the song, yeah right, before he even came out with the record, everybody knew the song cause he did so much at the parties (right).  I mean every party he did he did the same song and the whole crowd was right with him.

 

Performance Footage Wynne Ballroom, West Philly 1986

 

Breeze (performance):

So I said hold up a minute, you’re talking too fast, I’ll break this glass off in your Chinese ass!

 

FWS:

It really didn’t even become an issue until main stream media got wind of the product.

 

Breeze (reading article):

There I go – Chinatown.  Madness.  I got on a Kangol hat with a suit.  I never fit in, I wasn’t trying to fit in either.  I actually made that suit.  I used to sew…. Couldn’t afford no clothes so I made my own.  Let’s see – ‘a very popular locally produced rap song has been taken off the air in a major radio station because it was found to be hostile and demeaning towards Chinese people.  Even so, the song – Discombobulatorbubulator by MC Breeze, that’s me, remains among the most requested songs at the radio station and is selling well at record stores that cater to rap music fans’.  (at neighborhood store)  Well basically how – Discombobulatorbubulator got  on the radio was, my initial, when I actually finally got around to taking the record to record stores, guys like Chino, were actually playing the record in the record store.

 

Bruce Webb

I am Bruce C. Webb, owner of Webb’s department store since 1963.  I’m on the back of the Discombobulator 12”, my name is on the back of it, um, you know, a thank you Mr. Webb for giving him advice….

 

Breeze:

People would be coming in the store to buy one record, and Chino would be playing my record, and that’s how my record took off, basically by in-store play.

 

BW:

I played it for him in house, I had Asians across the street from me, but I played it.

 

Breeze:

People got wind of it and then people started buying the record and then Lady B actually had to go to the record store to purchase the record.

 

DST:

There was like this underground hit and then boom, it hit Lady B.

Lady B:

It was hip-hop on the radio in Philadelphia.

 

FWS:

Hip-hop was under attack from all angles.  Hip-hop was almost a bunker mentality, it was us against the rest of the world

 

Breeze:

You had a situation where the adults were shunning rap.  The authorities were shunning rap.  Mayors and all these different people were knocking rap.  Television was knocking rap, everywhere you went, rap was being knocked.

 

Lady B:

It was like walking on egg shells playing hip-hop in the beginning because it was a new music form and people looked at it as some kind of radical you know um street oriented bad thing.

 

?uestlove:

We weren’t

allowed to say that rhyme in school at all.

 

FWS:

Breeze was, you know, ahead of his time with that.  He knew what buttons to push.  I mean, we just thought, ok so he’s just making a song about his experience which to a certain extent he’ll tell you that’s all he was doing.

 

Breeze:

I wasn’t thinking ok make a record about Chinese food and it’s gonna be controversial, no.  I made a record about Chinese food that I thought was funny and I put it out because I wanted to put it out.  I said that Chinese people cook with cats and dogs, which was something I got off of 60 minutes.  I’m watching 60 minutes, and they said they cook with cats and dogs.  I put it in my song.  It’s already and urban myth, you know urban legend that Chinese people cook with cats and dogs.  So to me that wasn’t a big deal, I saw it on 60 minutes.  So I’m just repeating what I saw on the television.

The other thing was that I used the word Chink in the record.  That was controversial because you’re using the word Chink to describe an Asian person which is a derogatory way to describe Asian folks.  But at the time, it didn’t matter to me because I would watch Greased Lightning and I would hear the word Nigger throughout the whole movie from the time the movie starts to the time the movie ends, I’m hearing white folks call black people nigger so I’m like well look that’s the way it’s done.

 

BW:

What MC Breeze was doing was relating to his experiences in his neighborhood and not only with Chinese people or whatever but that’s just part of hip-hop, that’s part of the blues, that’s part of jazz.  I told him don’t worry about it.

 

E-Vette and Lady B:

I think it helped him, I think it got him a lot of press, yeah the controversy, man helps sometime:

 

FWS:

When the controversy came, he didn’t shy away from it and that helped him to sell more records you know, before there was Cop Killer and Ice T, that was really the first time that a record was banned from radio play that you know city council was involved with it and saying we can’t have this record played in our communities and that made us feel good.

 

Breeze:

It was good for me, I had Asian people trying to buy the record at this point, you know.  Trying to figure out what the problem was.

 

LB:

People just didn’t want to accept it as an art form and look, now you got Chinese people doing rap songs!  That lets you know how far we’ve come. That’s true.

 

Breeze:

They had no clue.  They had no clue how to market it I mean we’re talking about 1985 and here I have a rap record out with a ballad on the other side.  How do you market this dude? And even when I got record deals, its like how do you market it?  And you know people think Lauryn Hill was the first person to rap and sing and that’s just not true.

 

BF:

It probably didn’t go out of Philly.  You know it stayed in the Philly area but different songs went worldwide.  So I think if Breeze would have got the right backing, Breeze was independent and J wasn’t, I think he was going worldwide.

 

 JJ:

Looking back in hindsight, to me what made that record incredible and that record

Breeze made Discombobulatorbubalator… on a four track and you know it was kind of like, when everybody is talking about all you gotta do is do it on this kind of equipment and you gotta do it in this kind of studio this kind of environment, Breeze to me what Discombobulatorbubalator… showed me was that a good record is what’s the most important factor in all of this.

(performance footage).  I don’t care if you go to the best studio, have the best producers and the best musicians, if the record’s not good, people ain’t gonna feel it.  It’s like; no one said they didn’t like the sound of Breeze’s record.  You know, no one said oh my God I don’t like the quality of this record.  It was kind of like, I like the record and what you realize is the people that you’re making records for aren’t as technical as the people who are making the records.

 

SD:

(Laughing) arrogant? No, Egotistical, no.  Ass? No.

 

FWS:

Strong.  He’s like the strongest cup of coffee that you’ll ever come across.

 

DST:

Tenacious.

 

Malika:

Whatever comes into his head, right or wrong, Breeze will say it.  He does not bite his tongue.

 

DDave:

Breeze is a talkative person.

 

SD: 

There is not one word to describe MC Breeze.  Because there’s so many, like some days I talk to him and he’s like, he’s so inspirational to me, you know what I mean.  He’s like talk to me at like 5 in the morning to like 7 in the morning if I’m not doing well, and it’s like I’m feeling inspirational.  The next minute he’s like the most um, he’s a very sad artist also.  You know, he feels like he’s been like stepped over like a few times and that makes him very sad.

 

FWS:

His confidence could be mistaken easily for cockiness or being conceited.  I mean, I know otherwise because I got to know him you know more than most people did.

 

Malika:

And then, you know what?  He doesn’t have a problem with saying…. With apologizing if he’s wrong.  You have to make him realize that he’s wrong, but he’s you know when it’s all said and done, he’s a real sweet guy.

 

Breeze:

(Getting photo albums) You guys, we are bringing out the past.  Look at this thing, man, it’s a mess.  There’s me, my ex girlfriend and Dougie Fresh.  That was my partner, man.  We were on Hammer’s label at the same time.  This is me and Chuck back at Rose’s Salsa Disco, used to be on 13th and Locust.  That’s Faye….hey Faye!   (Background laughter)  Damn!   That’s Faye.  This is my baby, Left Eye.  When she was, uh, before Ain’t Too Proud to Beg.  We went together, I guess about a good eight or nine months.  We went together, we lived in the same house, and everything.  When we were going together, she used to help with my shows and I had explosives, she would set them off, and she’s really smart.  Everything that I showed her how to do, she learned like this (fingersnap).  The pyro’s, everything.  She was responsible.  She was like my stage hand.  (So she learned how to burn shit up?) (laughter).  No, I think that was just a black female thing.  This baby right here, I thought was mine – see I was a little wildly dressed.  I thought he was my kid and then I got a blood test said he wasn’t.  Here’s another kid, Dante.  He was blamed on me – not mine.  Now this is my son, Nicholas.  He had some really bad eye problems when he was a lot younger.  He was four there, he’s 13 now.  I wish this other kid was mine.  I mean, you know a kid for two years, you love him, you know?  I think that’s the most horrendous crime anybody could do to anybody else.  To blame a child on the wrong person is just like ridiculous.  I wrote a song about it.  You wanna hear it?  Here it goes (song and video) –

I met a girl in a disco she said good to go you’re cute and I said oh tell me something that I didn’t know.  She said gimme a kiss and I said Whoa!  I don’t know you girl I might get blisters.  She said you can have me and my sister.  I said hmmm well that changes  things, well let’s go to my crib and do the wild thing.  We got to the crib the 2 girls and I and I was all set for Ménage A Trois.  We did the wild thing by candle light and then I tried to get her sister she said yeah right.  The girl’s name I just won’t say, so in the meantime, we’ll just call her K.  I skeeted K yeah I admit it.  I was the bat and she was the ball and I hit it.  I knocked her boots a couple of times.  She got knocked up and said that the baby was mine.  Mama’s baby – Papa’s maybe.  I gave it my best without hesitation but it was …..  It ain’t my kid… it ain’t my baby.

 

No I didn’t have the big dookie stuff, just moderate shit.  Yeah, I got pictures of money and yeah, that’s my money man cash from records – no I think I got hit by a car and that was case money.  I don’t remember man!    (Can we talk about the money and the fame?)

Fame?  There wasn’t no fame.  Was I famous?  Am I? Was I?   I don’t know, I just made records man.  I never looked at it as fame.  I was still living down ‘the bottom’ .  I was still living in the neighborhood, I didn’t have no Benz, it never was for that.  You put a record out so more people can have access to your material, that’s what I put records out for.  So I didn’t have to rap at a house party for a thousand people.  I could make ten thousand records and spread my rap around, that’s what I made music for.  People thought I was     because I was a loner.  You know it was like really weird for me to walk down the street of a neighborhood where nobody really spoke.  And all of a sudden, you know, the record’s out and people say ‘Hey Breeze!  Discombobulatorbubulator!  Cap N Crunch!’ and I was like, I was taken aback by it, but it also was like, I’m the same guy, you know, you guys wouldn’t speak to me before, now you’re only speaking to me because I put a record out.  I didn’t think that was cool, so I was like, look, I’m going back in the crib and my own environment with my music and my records and it just didn’t make sense.

 

DD:

I’ve known Breeze since, well about 20 years.  I knew him when he first came to West Philly, cause he had lived in the North, um, I took him under my wing when he first came because he was getting up in my group and so I’ve known him since then, until we got into our discrepancies and he left.  He got a job at Domino’s and he got my brother a job there also and then they came out with the record and so that was about a year and so I wound up getting back with him because my brother was doing some DJ’ing and my brother ended up being on the forefront with him, so I wound up being the DJ so we was all right back together, like nothing ever happened.  He used to close himself off from everybody, like I said he don’t listen to the radio, he don’t watch that much TV he just is into him and I told him that’s a bad thing and he should listen to the radio, see what’s out there and so he could do his upcoming album around this new stuff.  But like I said, he don’t watch no news or nothing, he’s just into himself.

 

(Was there ever a minute, a moment in his career where it looked like the sky was the limit, where it looked like he was going to blow up huge?)

 

Yeah, when he went to sign with the Hammer label.

(1991 Performance footage and home video)

 

Breeze:

I just want to say, you know, I’ve had a great time in Europe and it’s a nice place to visit.  I wouldn’t want to live here.  Look at this, man, you take the key and at first there’s a red light, put it in, get a green light – good to go.   This is the shower, and over here on my right, is another bathroom.  Look, I’m the only one here.  Amsterdam was a cool place but they’re a little bit dry.  Germany is a little uptight.

(Interviewer: Joey, you are at the moment the number 4 on our charts.  Do you think you will soon be the number 1?)   Definitely.  (Definitely, you are sure?)  Yes.

You got Belgium, the waffles are great, but.

(Interviewer: You have a lot of competition with a lot of different rappers, does that make it hard for you?)  Well, I’m not a rapper,  I am a rap artist that sings and raps, so there’s not a whole lot of competition  for that because I can go from one end of the spectrum to the next.

Paris, I don’t know about all this hoopla with lovers and all that kind of stuff, but it’s still the same, you gotta fall in love with Paris.

This shit is over!   Love, peace and may all this bullshit cease.  I am out of here.  World tour 1991.  That’s it – I’m going back to Philadelphia.

-(Back Home)-

 

I got something that’s cool.   This right here XXL magazine put this thing out.  It’s all the hip-hoppers, man, just like the great day in Harlem when they did the jazz musicians Gordon Parks took the picture.  (Pointing ) I am right here.  That’s Schooly right next to me.  Knowledge!  Gordon Parks.  XXL New York Harlem.  This is cool, it’s at the world premiere for Rocky V the movie in LA.  Red carpet treatment. Walk down the carpet.  You’re looking at me, this is Sylvester Stallone’s son.  He’s in the movie too.  There’s the Slyster guy man and this is Tanetta Harris.  She sang.  She was a Bust It artist as well and she sang on the track.

 

(Soul Train Footage).

Don Cornelius:  Joey B. you’re sort of a discovery of MC Hammer.  He’s selected you to be a part of his production process on his label right?

Yes. I met him in 1987 at a music seminar and when he got his break, he pulled me into his camp.  DC: What was it that Hammer thought was unique about you? Well, I was the only rapper in that particular event that rapped and sang in the same event.  DC: That’s kind of difficult to do, huh?  Yeah.  DC:  It must have been fun being a part of  the Rocky V movie, right?  Definitely.  Because I’m from Philadelphia and Sylvester Stallone is from Philadelphia.  So it’s a real nice connection.  (Video – Go for it).

 

Breeze:

Joey B. Ellis.  My family calls me Joey, the B stands for Breeze, my last name is Ellis.  Some fucking company put out another artist with my fucking name so I had to change my name to do the Rocky V album.  I paid for that shit.  I was with Hammer.  Hammer didn’t —- no more.

 

Breeze: Hammer! Hammer! Don’t hurt em’!  Nah let me stop.

 

FWS:

In the early 90’s MC Breeze sang with Bust It Records which was a record label from MC Hammer.  And at the time, it looked like that was it.  That was Breezes launching pad.  To international success because in the early 90s, MC Hammer was Michael Jackson and Prince all rolled into one.

 

(Interview Footage):  MC Hammer’s hard, he’s also soft, he’s also meek, he’s also humble, he’s also biblical, he’s also righteous.  He’s also vengeful and he’s all those things combined into one individual to make MC Hammer,

 

(Grammy Footage, Commercial footage, Video Footage)

FSW:

MC Hammer was everywhere you went.  I mean, you turn on Entertainment Tonight and there was hammer.  There were MC Hammer dolls.  He may have been the first hip-hopper ever to have a toy.  You would even see MC Hammer on Saturday mornings on cartoon.  I mean, you couldn’t escape MC Hammer.  From the visual presence and his music, he had the fashion with those baggy, I mean to this day, people call them Hammer Pants.  He captured much more than the hip-hop world.  He was an entertainer.  I never thought that MC Hammer was a very good rapper.  He made his mark because he was an entertainer.  People more than anything want to be entertained.   Breeze had what MC Hammer possessed and he had the street credibility.  It looked then like MC Hammer would do for MC Breeze what Jay-Z has done for Beanie Segal.  But it just didn’t turn out that way because there was fighting in the Hammer Camp and Hammer spent lavishly.  He wasn’t prudent with his money and it dried up and when the money dried up, his career dried up and as a result, so did MC Breeze’s career.  The gravy train that MC Breeze had jumped on had suddenly derailed.  (Living Color footage)

 

Breeze and Friend:

See Hammer had all that extra material and shit.

 

Breeze:

See Philly, man, that’s the shit.  Love Philly.  Love it.  It’s only when you get home you find out mother fuckers don’t love you.

 

FWS:

One thing about MC Breeze’s Busted period is that he really didn’t get any love from Philly for that and it wasn’t that Philly, that the community had turned their back on Breeze, that wasn’t our style.  That was the direct influence of MC Hammer.  That song just wasn’t even a factor in Philadelphia.

 

SD:

You gotta blow up the cash man.  You gotta blow it then you move on from that.

 

DD:

When Hammer went man that’s when everything changed.  He came right back home. He said he could be broke out there in California or he could be broke at home. So he chose to come back home.

 

 

FWS:

He had to come back to the roots.

 

SD:

Everybody has to come home, man.  Everybody has to come full circle and come home so you can see who the hell you really are.  What kind of man or what kind of woman you are.

 

DD:

His brother got robbed, got hit in the back of the head with a baseball bat and he’s like almost brain dead, retarded.

 

Breeze:

I came home to my mother’s house.  Living in my mother’s house with a brain damaged, semi-retarded brother up in the room.  It’s one thing to know I got a brother that’s hurt somewhere.  It’s another thing to wake up everyday and see him and wish that he was not alive because I think that he would wish that he wasn’t.  My brother was a proud black man.  He was type of guy that would take a shower two or three times a day and change his clothes two or three times a day, so he could stay sharp for that day.  And here he is now, he can’t feed himself.  He can’t take a shower by himself.  He can’t go to the bathroom by himself.  He can’t walk straight or talk straight.  Everyday he’s wondering where he’s at.  Death would have been better.  Because every time I see him, I see him die over and over and over again, every single day.    I stayed at my mom’s house for three months, then I acquired this property.  I couldn’t go get a contractor, I couldn’t pay this person, but I could buy a book.  I bought a plumbing book, an electrical book, um carpentry book, whatever I needed.  Found out what the codes were.  I did everything I had to do to have me a place to live so I could feel like a man again.  Because I didn’t feel like a man living at my mom’s place.  Three years after that, my other brother was shot in the head, murdered.

 

DD:

They said that he committed suicide.  They said he put a gun to his head and shot himself, but they didn’t find his fingerprints on the gun.

 

Breeze:

I mean, we’re talking1996.  The last day I saw him.  I saw him all week on the block, you know, he was always on the block. I go down the way, I see my brother in the neighborhood.  Those days start to gel after awhile.  My mom called me and said ‘I got bad news about your brother – he’s dead.’  His name was Kenny,  Kenny Crash.  He used to rap and he was a good rapper.  A good father to his kids, one of the sweetest dudes you could ever meet.

 

DD:

Kenny wasn’t the type ———– and he had books and books and books.

 

Breeze:

For a year, I thought I was next.

 

DD:

He was depressed.  There was nothing I could say or do.

 

Breeze:

My one brother is brain damaged. The other was murdered.  Two separate incidents, two separate areas, don’t have anything to do with one another.  And I still thought that because my mom had three boys and two of them were down, that I was next.    I spent about a year walking around thinking that I was going to die next.

 

DD:

One thing he said was ‘man this pressure is not me’.

 

Breeze: 

Nobody ever knew that until I actually told my mom one day and she said ‘that’s insane’.  She said ‘do you remember the time when you were standing on 38th and Mt. Vernon and this guy had a 45 automatic aimed at your head?  And you were just sitting there looking at him like you didn’t even care if you lived or died and he didn’t shoot you.  Or the time you were standing on 38th and Haverford and there was an old man with a shotgun standing across the street because you were arguing with his granddaughter and so he pulled out a shotgun and everybody runs but you.  You’re standing there, telling him to shoot you and he didn’t’.  She said ‘you survived’ and this time when I was at Belmont Plateau and they had a problem at the Wynne Ballroom and these guys chased us home with guns, so I went to the Plateau looking for them and the guy stood right in front of me and started shooting, didn’t hit  me one time but he shot some girl in the back and I mean, just crazy stuff that I’ve been through.  And she said ‘you survived all that, now you think you’re gonna die?  You ain’t dying you ain’t getting off that damned easy! Go back out there and do what you been doing, what you’re supposed to be doing, making your music and the whole nine’.  That woke me up.  That woke me up.

 

DD:

He has a love for music.

 

Breeze:

It took a long time to see a lot of the stuff that my mom had went through and had been going through and I can’t even put myself in her place.  She’s done more with nothing than most people have done who have everything in the world.

 

SD:

I don’t even wanna start thinking about it because we both made some mistakes.

 

JJ:

I don’t look at experiences like that that are bad.  You know to me there’s too many people that talk about what you should and shouldn’t do and they haven’t done anything.  You know, the people that you need to listen to are the people who have had the experiences.

 

DD:

He was kind of reluctant about it at first, like I’m in the middle of dealing with this and I don’t want to do it.  But I said ‘Breeze we need your help’

 

FWS:

The greater Philadelphia Hip Hop Alliance is a coalition of DJ’s, rappers, city artists and break dancers from the greater Philadelphia region.  There’s three people that co-founded the organization.  Myself, Disco Dave from B Force, and MC Breeze.

 

DD:

My goal was to help the struggling artists that need the help that don’t have the money and don’t have the revenue to take it to another level.  All the contacts that I’ve had before, I can help them out.  The real objective is to teach all of the new artists the culture of hip-hop.

 

FWS:

The alliance has very quickly grown and almost doubled attendance monthly.

 

DD:

If you look at his life, it’s in his rap and he’s telling people how he got where he’s at.

 

(Alliance Video)

Breeze: When I wanted to make my first record with my man Handmaster Flash, we were in B Force and I asked B Force, come on let’s make a record.  They didn’t believe in it. (DD: I didn’t)  They didn’t believe in it and it was crazy.  I said we could make a record.  I did all the research, we could do it but they really didn’t believe it so I got to the point where I wasn’t in the group anymore, I went back and picked up Johnny and we started working on the stuff because he believed in it. Right Flash (laughter).

 

Home Video

Breeze:

We started playing basketball every Monday and Thursday about two years ago.

 

DD:

He changed he never passed he was no change give him the correct change cause you ain’t gone get no change back you might as well go and get the rebound He ain’t gonna pass, man.  He ain’t got no problem shooting from anywhere around the world, halfcourt line, 3 point line  Out of bounds fallen slippin last couple of games he was passin I was here breeze take it back shoot

 

FWS:

I don’t think that MC Breeze on wax has ever reached his potential.  I think MC Breeze is kind of like a Robert Johnson.  You know, there were a lot of blues masters that were talented and we’re just now finding out on a wide scale that wow, these guys were talented.  They never got paid and they didn’t put out a lot of records, but from the limited amount of material that you hear, you can hear the artistry.

 

Dr. Shock:

I’m Dr. Shock and I’m creator and producer of the Philly Urban Legend Awards.  The Philly Urban Legend Awards is an Awards show that basically awards people that were involved in instrumental and R&B and hip-hop and things of that nature and the groups that might not have gotten the big awards but we want to let them know in the Urban area that we really do appreciate them.  (Awards show footage).  MC Breeze is one of our recipients of the award this year.

 

JJ:

The beauty of Breeze is one thing that probably also hurt was that he could do everything so well, he didn’t have one thing to focus on to become the best at it.  And I would always tell him that.  Its like ‘Breeze, you know, you’re so good at everything’.  It’s like if he didn’t rhyme sing or do anything else and just made clothes, Breeze could probably be the head designer and Sean Jean.  If Breeze didn’t do anything else but MC, he might have been one of the best MC’s in the world.  If he didn’t do anything else but sing, Breeze could probably have a great singing career.  But it was kind of like, I respected the ability that he did everything and it was like he really didn’t want to lock himself down, he was like ‘I want to do everything’ and that’s Breeze.  You know last week, Breeze comes up to me and says ‘yo, I’m making a movie’ and I’m just looking at him and it’s like you can’t understand how much I admire his drive and determination to just do what he wants to do and he finds a way, you know what I mean, it’s like you know, you don’t always have to make a record, with the best equipment, you don’t always have to make a movie with ten or twelve cameras.  You could make a movie with a video camera.

 

(Casting Call home video)

Breeze:  This is stage three – the casting call, you know?  We had a meeting, we had a script written, and this is stage three, the casting call so you know, bear with us, and hopefully we’ll get all our actors in one night. (You’re not going to be in there?)  They don’t need me, but I’m getting ready to go paint this sign to re-direct folks.  I do it all.

End credits – Philly Boy Music Video

 

He was the first MC to sing, the first to be banned from the radio, and one of the first to make an independent record – but you may not even remember his name.  In Philly boy, filmmaker Michael Dennis threads together an oral history of MC Breeze (aka Joey B. Ellis), the rapper who emerged from Philadelphia’s thriving hip-hop scene in the ‘80s to make his distinctive mark on the genre.  “I’m just a Philly boy,” Breeze sings in the film, and then goes on to tell a life story that proves just the opposite.  Both a skillful rhymer and a soulful crooner, Breeze and his ‘Discombobulatorbubulator’ and ‘It Ain’t New York’ were a fixture at hometown house parties.  But a controversial single and his unmatched talent took him from what they called “the bottom” in West Philly all the way to the top, touring the world with MC Hammer.  Here, hip-hop legends Jazzy Jeff, Schooly D, the Mighty B-Force, Malika Love, Cash Money, the Root’s ?uestlove and others share their stories of the enigmatic genius who kept everybody guessing.

 

Katie Heagele writes about arts and entertainment for Philadelphia Weekly and several magazines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video tells the story Of MC Breeze a Philly Recording artist that started making records with a Dominoes Pizza Job. Features Quest love, DJ jazzy Jeff, Lady B, Dice Raw, Schoolly D Talking about MC Breeze AKA Joey b Ellis one of Philadelphia’s Hip Hop Pioneers